fbpx

HPHR Fellows

SEO Center For Black Church Studies

I’ve heard people say the story of our lives is best told in the snapshot of those who show up for our funeral. Final services for members of the LGBTQ+ community in the South are often layered with stigma and controversy. Due to grief (and sometimes denial), families often eulogize the person in a way that is more reflective of who they wish the person was (rather than who they actually were at the time of their passing).

Stories from Silent Survivors of Divine Punishment: Faith and Loomy Juice (Pt. 1)

In the mid 2000s, Loomy juice was an increasingly popular natural drink, rumored to contain ingredients with organic healing qualities. Sam seemed to drink multiple bottles a week, combining every swallow with his incredible faith. I would later come to find out why he felt he needed both to survive.

Cordella Lyon: Hepatitis B and C: Prevalence and Care with Dr Matthew Andrews
Cordella Lyon: Caring Connections Podcast with HPHR Fellow Cordella Lyon
Cordella Lyon: HIV 40 Years Later: Interview with Helen Turner
Cordella Lyon: Interview With Dr. Rosanna Barrett: Disaggregating Data, Making Everyone Count
Cordella Lyon: Life By Proxy: Interview with Greg Schwartz
Stories from Silent Survivors of Divine Punishment: It’s Just Us, Anthony.

Ted Winn, a gospel artist who grew up in Black churches, has known between 40 and 50 people who lost their lives to HIV/AIDS. He says, “I choose to not allow them to be ‘othered’ or described as deviants, but people who were seeking love, relationship, affirmation, and happiness.”

Stories from Silent Survivors of Divine Punishment: JJ and Lamont

The denial of HIV’s early impact was so severe in some African American faith communities that ‘church cancer’ became the colloquial term used when explaining the cause of death for the formerly embraced, now stigmatized (and socially-abandoned) gay men who passed away from AIDS complications.

Uncovering ‘Church Cancer:’ Stories from Silent Survivors of Divine Punishment

The denial of HIV’s early impact was so severe in some African American faith communities that ‘church cancer’ became the colloquial term used when explaining the cause of death for the formerly embraced, now stigmatized (and socially-abandoned) gay men who passed away from AIDS complications.

Graphic by Nick Bauer.

In this second piece together, Sofia and Nick stress the urgency of fighting for health equity for Canada's Indigenous populations – now.

Graphic by Nick Bauer.

Here, Sofia Weiss Goitiandia talks to activist Nick Bauer about the injustices committed against Indigenous peoples in Canada, which do not always receive the attention they deserve.

This vlog discusses the importance of integrating the dental and medical fields when approaching cancer treatment plans.

64561352 678490882594495 9080942202535804928 N

“Imagine working in an office where you know that everyone who comes through the doors is gonna die. I remember telling one of my clients who was dying that I didn’t know if I could continue doing the work anymore, because I wasn't making a difference and I couldn't keep watching people die. He told me I had an obligation to help everyone I saw, even if I only saved one life in all the time I worked in HIV/AIDS. That was over 30 years ago." - Earl Fowlkes

In this final instalment of Sofia and Dalia’s interview, Dalia synthesises her experiences as an activist in the field of Sexual and Reproductive Health, and shares her views on what 'Decolonising Global Health' means in practice.

D734D959 03FE 4E3C BB65 41D9C7657C76

In the second installment of this article series, Sofia and Dalia discuss Female Genital Mutilation and Dalia’s activism towards ending it in her home country of Sudan. Please be aware that these sensitive topics may be distressing for some readers.

Unhappy

Randevyn Pierre has collected and shared the experiences of a number of African Americans around healthcare hesitancy and medical mistrust. In this piece, he exposes his own thoughts and experiences in navigating his journey through the healthcare landscape. Pierre also infuses key learnings from his public health knowledge as well as other accounts from interviewees.

HPHR Fellows Interview Anthony S. Fauci, MD, Chief Medical Advisor to the President & NIAID Director
Smoke GIF CIRA

How does wildfire smoke impact our health, and how can we reduce this harm?

Former President Barack Obama is famously quoted as saying, “we have more in common than we have things that divide us.” This philosophy may or may not have moved the needle on this country’s politics around human decency, but perhaps it offers us a start to reducing healthcare hesitancy in exam rooms all over the United States.

Print